One article – gtg

We have many years of experience in dealing with every sort of tooth and dental development issue, and are very willing to help you make an informed decision about the treatment choices for your child. Like many procedures, the effectiveness of early treatment can only be determined on an individual basis. Here, we explain our viewpoint on early treatment options.

What is early treatment?
The terms ‘early treatment,’ ‘interceptive treatment,’ or ‘phase I treatment’ are all basically the same thing. This form of treatment is usually done when the child is 8 to 10 years old and will have 8-12 baby teeth present in the mouth.

Phase II treatment consists of fixed appliances (metal braces) and is usually done when the patient is older and all the baby teeth are gone and the permanent teeth are in the mouth. For girls, this is about 11 ½ years old and for boys about 12 ½ years of age on the average.

Are there drawbacks to early treatment?
Early treatment is great when it is indicated and appropriate. Dental problems such as crowding or crossbites are usually corrected best through early treatment at age 9 or 10. A second stage of treatment with braces will usually be required at age 11 ½ for girls, and at age 12 ½ for boys to finish aligning the teeth.

However, what we discovered was that it was still taking about 20 months of the metal braces to finish aligning the teeth at age 12 to 13. So, we could do two phases of treatment, taking 28-32 months, or we could be a little patient and do all the treatment in one step, taking about 24 months in the metal braces.

Which was the better way? Well, by just doing one phase of treatment, the parents saved money, the child had fewer hoops to jump through, and the results were basically the same.

When do we recommend early treatment?
We love to see the kids about age 9 or 10 years old, or even younger if mom and dad have a concern about their child’s teeth. It is much rather be ahead of the game than behind. Sometimes we will turn the patient loose for a little while, and then when he/she is ready, start the correct early treatment.

And of course, there are instances where treating the patient at 9 or 10 works out great! If all the upper teeth are too narrow (called a crossbite), 9 or 10 is a great time to correct this. Sometimes a front tooth is stuck and won’t come down, or is sticking straight out – 9 or 10 is a great time to correct this.

​We firmly believe in early treatment. It just needs to be used when it is truly indicated. Call now to schedule a consultation to discuss treatment options and see what financing plans you qualify for.

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Just one article – gtg

Your teeth don’t have to show your age!

We can’t stop aging, but we can make the best of what we already have. Looking after your skin and general appearance is one step. But what about your teeth? They are a revealing sign of aging – yet surprising things can be done today to reverse this process.

Staying young-looking

Teeth are one of the first features that people look at. Our teeth deteriorate over the years, gradually taking on more and more imperfections that betray our age – or make us look even older than we really are. In Western society, where one in six people will soon be over 65, everybody wants to stay as young-looking as possible. So how can a 50-year old stay young-looking? Well, maybe he/she has fortunate genes, looks after their skin regularly (often in addition to great genes) and has had excellent cosmetic facial surgery. To look at them, you wouldn’t be able to guess their true age – until they smile. Then their mouth gives the game away. How? Because of the state of their teeth.

Signs of aging – your teeth

So how do your teeth betray your age? Their color changes over time, losing brightness and luminosity, and becoming darker. Dental wear will shorten teeth, making them look ‘stubby’. Years of food, nicotine and fluid stains can also stain teeth permanently.

Tooth shape: The natural smile line is a gentle convex. But extensive wear on our front teeth can change this to a straight or even concave line (reversed curve). Tooth grinding (prompted by stress), accelerates this dental erosion. Chipped tooth edges are another sign, creating an unbalanced and disharmonious look.

Tooth surface: The fine ridges on young teeth get smoothed away as we get older. While in early adulthood such smoothing can produce attractive teeth that reflect light more uniformly, too much smoothing will show age.

Tooth crack lines: Over time, micro-fractures can appear on the enamel surface. While perhaps superficial, they can show up as little crack lines, which will downgrade the attractiveness of teeth

Filled front teeth: White fillings in front teeth need to be regularly replaced or they change color and start to look obvious. They may even show dark lines between the edge of the filling and the natural tooth.

Smile color: White reflects light and dark absorbs it. A mouth with silver-mercury (amalgam) fillings in many of the teeth will present an overall dull grey color that absorbs light and therefore looks dark. It’s another sign of aging.

Signs of aging – your lips

Over time the lips lose muscle tone and become thinner and narrower. The top lip can sag, covering more of the upper teeth. The lower lip may also drop, showing more of the lower teeth. If you had fairly thin lips when young, then they will become even more so. Also thin vertical lines appear in the lips, which are accentuated and hastened by smoking. Crease lines can also appear at the corners of the lips, often with a more significant, deeper crease line, angled downward, which can make you look permanently unhappy.

What can you do restore youthful looks?

Your smile is the key to your facial appearance. So you need to do something about any old, worn, chipped and discolored teeth you have and remove these obvious clues of aging. The essence in good cosmetic/ aesthetic dentistry is to combine modern techniques with artistic flair – so that nobody can guess what’s been done.

Ways of improving your teeth

Re-contouring: A little bleaching whitens the teeth and slight reshaping restores the edges of the teeth to what they were in youth

Replacing fillings: Using modern materials for the front and most prominent teeth can cause the dental restoration work to blend in with the general color of the tooth.

Bonding: A synthetic material that looks like natural tooth enamel is bonded to the enamel tooth surface. Because it can be shaped and polished, this material can alter the color, texture, size, shape and even, to an extent, the position of the teeth. The treatment can be applied to the eight to twelve upper front teeth. It lasts from three to six years.

Veneering: A technique similar to bonding – only more permanent. A thin, hard porcelain veneer is individually made for each tooth to the correct color, size and shape. Porcelain is as durable as the original tooth enamel so the restored tooth will last for decades rather than years. Veneering is often done on front incisor teeth that have been damaged.

Improving your lips

Thin lips can be treated by using fillers to accentuate the lip line (vermillion border) between the red part of the lips and the normal skin. These fillers are, for example, bovine collagen, or natural hyaluronic acid (Restylane). The effect lasts up to twelve months. The substance of the lip can also be increased by injecting Restylane or even fat from another part of the body into the lip itself. The result, of course, depends on how much and where it is placed.

So how can your smile make you look younger?

Look in the mirror for a few minutes. Decide what parts of your face, and particularly your smile, you would like to rejuvenate using the techniques mentioned above. Then consult with a cosmetic dental surgeon, who can show you an accurate simulation of how treatment would look on your face. It is advisable to do this before going ahead with any cosmetic surgery on your face.

Most cosmetic medical surgeons are still not orientated or even knowledgeable enough about what cosmetic dentists are able to achieve with teeth. A few short dental treatments can take years off your looks, helping you evaluate whether other surgery is necessary.

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orthodontics 3/18/2019 – gtg

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Ortho Dictionary
Parts of Braces
Appliance
Anything your orthodontist attaches to your teeth which moves your teeth or changes the shape of your jaw.

Arch wire
The metal wire that acts as a track to guide your teeth along as they move. It is changed periodically throughout treatment as your teeth move to their new positions.

Band
A metal ring that is cemented to your tooth, going completely around it. Bands provide a way to attach brackets to your teeth.

Bond
The seal created by orthodontic cement that holds your appliances in place.

Bracket
A metal or ceramic part cemented (“bonded”) to your tooth that holds your arch wire in place.

Coil Spring
A spring that fits between your brackets and over your arch wire to open space between your teeth.

Elastic (Rubber Band)
A small rubber band that is hooked between different points on your appliance to provide pressure to move your teeth to their new position.

Elastic Tie
The tiny rubber band that fits around your bracket to hold the arch wire in place. They come in a variety of colors.

Headgear
Headgear uses an external wire apparatus known as a facebow to gently guide the growth of your face and jaw by moving your teeth into proper position. The force is applied to the facebow by a spring-loaded neck strap or head strap. The straps have a safety release that disconnects if the facebow is pulled or snagged.

Headgear Tube
A round, hollow attachment on your back bands. The inner bow of your headgear fits into it.

Hook
A welded or removable arm to which elastics are attached.

Ligature
A thin wire that holds your arch wire into your bracket.

Lip Bumper
A lip bumper is an arch wire attached to a molded piece of plastic. The lip bumper holds back the molars on your lower jaw to provide more space for your other teeth.

Mouthguard
A device that protects your mouth from injury when you participate in sports or rigorous activities.

Palatal Expander
A device that makes your upper jaw wider.

Retainer
An appliance that is worn after your braces are removed, the retainer attaches to your upper and/or lower teeth to hold them in place. Some retainers are removable, while others are bonded to the tongue-side of several teeth.

Separator or Spacer
A small rubber ring that creates space between your teeth before the bands are attached.

Tie Wire
A fine wire that is twisted around your bracket to hold the arch wire in place.

Wax
Wax is used to stop your braces from irritating your lips.

Orthodontic Procedures
Banding
The process of fitting and cementing orthodontic bands to your teeth.

Bonding
The process of attaching brackets to your teeth using special orthodontic cement.

Cephalometic X-ray
An x-ray of your head which shows the relative positions and growth of the face, jaws, and teeth.

Consultation
A meeting with your orthodontist to discuss a treatment plan.

Debanding
The process of removing cemented orthodontic bands from your teeth.

Debonding
The process of removing cemented orthodontic brackets from your teeth.

Impressions
The process of making a model of your teeth by biting into a soft material that hardens into a mold of your teeth. Your orthodontist will use these impressions to prepare your treatment plan.

Invisalign
An alternative to traditional braces, Invisalign straightens your teeth with a series of clear custom-molded aligners. Invisalign can correct some, but not all, orthodontic problems.

Ligation
The process of attaching an arch wire to the brackets on your teeth.

Panoramic X-ray
An x-ray that rotates around your head to take pictures of your teeth, jaw, and other facial areas.

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